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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

Physical activity based a traditional- and supervised sports practice: a tracking study of long-term follow up in younger students

Abstract Theme

Physical activity and health

Type Presentation

Poster

Abstract Authors

Presenter Roberta Luksevicius Rica - São Judas Tadeu University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil (Translational Physiology Laboratory) - BR
João Marcelo de Querioz Miranda - São Judas Tadeu University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil (Translational Physiology Laboratory) - BR
Marcio Roberto Doro - São Judas Tadeu University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil (Translational Physiology Laboratory) - BR
Aylton Figueira Junior - São Judas Tadeu University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil (Translational Physiology Laboratory) - BR
Eliane Florencio Gama - São Judas Tadeu University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil (Translational Physiology Laboratory) - BR
Danilo Sales Bocalini - São Judas Tadeu University, São Paulo, SP, Brazil (Translational Physiology Laboratory) - BR

Presentation Details

Poster Exhibition Site (Local): Yellow - 14        Date: 1 September        Time: 8am to 7pm        Presenter: Roberta Rica

Abstract Resume

Background: The maintenance of appropriate parameters of health-related physical status are recognized for contributing to the structural and functional aspects in different ages.
Additionally, an inverse relationship with the development of chronic diseases in adulthood had been observed with increased physical inactivity among children, contributed with alterations in health
profile. Furthermore, evidence of the changes magnitude in anthropometric and functional parameters still unclear in long-term follow-up. In this way, the aim of this study was compare the physical
fitness of children who underwent traditional- and supervised sports practice in scholar environmental.
Methods: Three years longitudinal study (February 2008, 2009 and 2010) was designed to follow up 50 children (from 8 to 10 years) into two randomized groups: traditional- (T, n: 27)
and supervised- sport group (S, n: 23). The T group was submitted to traditional physical education (2 days per week for 50 minutes each class - totaling 100 minutes per weekly). The S was submitted
to traditional physical education and additional a supervised sport activities (5 days per week for 60 minutes each session - totaling 400 minutes per weekly). It was evaluated the: a) anthropometric
(body mass (BM, kg), stature (ST, cm), body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and adiposity by the sum of triceps, subscapular and suprailiac skinfolds (SF, mm); b) neuromotor (agility (A, sec), stand long
jump (LJ, m) and trunk strength (TS, rep) as upper limb strength by fixed bar stand of arms (FB, sec). The statistic analysis was assessed by Linear Person Correlation and Student t Test with p <.05
as significance.
Results: Our data showed that between 2008 and 2010, no differences were found in BM (T: 31 ± 7; S: 26 ± 9%), S (T: 11 ± 2; S: 10 ± 2%), SF (T: 17 ± 13; S: 10 ± 17%), A (T: -36 ± 20;
S: -41 ± 23%). On the other hand significant changes were found for BMI  (T: 12 ± 9; S: 8 ± 9; p=0.012), HI (T: 12 ± 10; S: 18 ± 10; p=0.03), TS (T: 10 ± 39; S: 31 ± 23; p=0.02) and FB (T: -62 ± 111,
S: 61 ± 27, p = 0.01). After analyses Linear Person correlation evidenced high tracking response to HI (r: .997), TS (r: .989) and TB (r: .995) to S group, similar results to r values were found to T
group (LJ: .996, TS: .935, TB: .894).
Conclusions: Our data suggested that the total amount of minutes per week contributed to BMI, LJ, TS and TB changes in T group.  On the other hand, the BM, S, and A variables remained
stable during three years follow up in both groups. These data allow us to suggest that children have to accumulate at least 300-400 minutes in sport practice and physical activity.


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