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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

Stressful and Recovery Indicators in Trail Runners

Abstract Theme

Sport medicine and injury prevention

Type Presentation

Poster

Abstract Authors

Presenter Victor Silva Alves - Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro - UFTM (Discente do curso de Fisioterapia da UFTM) - BR
Fabiana Aparecida Lavezzo - Universidade Federal de São Carlos - Ufscar (Departamento de Ciências Fsiológicas) - BR
Kamilla Kelly Noronha - Centro Universitário do Cerrado de Patrocínio - Unicerp (Discente do curso de Fisioterapia da Unicerp) - BR
Luzia Carla da Silva - Centro Universitário do Cerrado de Patrocínio - Unicerp (Discente do curso de Fisioterapia da Unicerp) - BR
Fredy Costa Guerra - Tendência Outdoor Assessoria Esportiva (Fundador e proprietário Tendência Outdoor Assessoria Esportiva) - BR
Flavio Rodrigues de Oliveira - Centro Universitário do Cerrado de Patrocínio - Unicerp (Docente do curso de Biologia da Unicerp) - BR
Cesar Augusto França Abrahão - Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro - UFTM (Departamento de Biologia estrutural) - BR

Presentation Details

Poster Exhibition Site (Local): Black - 21        Date: 1 September        Time: 8am to 7pm        Presenter: Victor Alves

Abstract Resume

Background: Sports practice leads athletes to various musculoskeletal and psychosocial alterations, often unidentifiable. Thus, this study sought to identify the levels of stress and
recovery that affect trail runner athletes in competitive training period.

Methods: Transversal study, the sample consisted of 45 trail runner athletes (34.0 ± 9.2 years) from the city of Uberlândia, Minas Gerais, with 29 men (33.5 ± 8.2 years) and 16 women
(34.9 ± 10.9 years). Stress and recovery processes of athletes were evaluated from the stress and recovery variables contained in the REST-Q Sport questionnaire that present qualitative and
quantitative characteristics.

Results: In the variable Stress, the highest frequency of responses were in the ratings Desirable (46.7%) and Satisfactory (31.1%) in General Stress dimension; Satisfactory (35.6%)
and Desirable (31.1%) in Emotional Stress dimension; Desirable (42.2%) and Satisfactory (35.6%) in Social Stress dimension; Tolerable (33.3%) and Satisfactory, Desirable and Worrying (17.8%) in
Conflicts / Pressure dimension; Satisfactory (31.1%) and Tolerable (28.9%) in Fatigue dimension; Satisfactory (35.6%) and Desirable (33.3%) in Energy Loss dimension; Satisfactory (31.1%) and Critical
(28.9%) in Physical Complaints dimension. In the variable Recovery, all dimensions had higher frequency responses in the Satisfactory rating: 80.0% in Success, 71.1% in Social Recovery, 86.7% in
Physical Recovery, 73.3% in General Wellbeing and 91.1% in Sleep Quality.

Conclusions: In the variable Stress the athletes indicated acceptable levels when confronted with current literature in the dimensions General Stress, Emotional Stress, Social Stress,
Fatigue and Energy Loss, but in Physical Complaints they presented rates that can characterize and supposedly evidence the influence of indirect markers of musculoskeletal alterations having
indicatives of other stressful variables. In the Recovery variable in all dimensions the athletes presented rates of acceptable answers, but adjacent to behaviors that favor a good recovery from the
sport.

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