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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

Active pelvic stabilization control in youth soccer athletes

Abstract Theme

Rehabilitation

Type Presentation

Poster

Abstract Authors

Presenter Bianca Feitosa Holanda - FANOR/DeVry (MUSCLE - Sports Rehabilitation Research Group) - BR
Jamille Soares Moreira Alves - FANOR/DeVry (MUSCLE - Sports Rehabilitation Research Group) - BR
Kamila Maria Oliveira Sales - FANOR/DeVry (MUSCLE - Sports Rehabilitation Research Group) - BR
Edfranck de Sousa Oliveira Vanderlei - FANOR/DeVry (MUSCLE - Sports Rehabilitation Research Group) - BR
Carlos Hermano da Justa Pinheiro - FANOR/DeVry (MUSCLE - Sports Rehabilitation Research Group) - BR

Presentation Details

Poster Exhibition Site (Local): Orange - 1        Date: 4 September        Time: 8am to 7pm        Presenter: CARLOS HERMANO DA JUSTA PINHEIRO

Abstract Resume

Background: The pelvis is a center of force transmission from appendicular to axial body. In fact, neuromuscular imbalances in  pelvis control could increase the risk of
musculoskeletal injury. In soccer, the rotation of trunk and pelvis in opposite directions is need during the kicking due to the action of internal and external obliquus abdominis on the kicking and
non-kicking sides, respectively. Thus, the active control of pelvic stabilization in transverse plane is an important biomechanical task on the performance and rehabilitation of soccer athletes. The
purpose of the present study was to evaluate the active control stabilization of pelvis in youth soccer athletes.


Methods: This was a cross-sectional study performed in thirty male soccer athletes (n=30) from under-9 (U-9), under-11 (U-11) and under-15 (U-15) categories who were submitted to the
evaluation of magnitude and asymmetry of pelvic tilt in transverse plane using the bridge test with unilateral knee extension. An inquiry for identify any kind of both musculoskeletal pain and history
of previous injury was also applied. The visual analogic scale (VAS) was used to determine athlete┬┤s pain perception. In the present study, all ethical aspects recommended by Resolution 466/12 of the
National Health Council were considered.


Results: The experience playing soccer ranges from 6 to 48 months for U-9 and from 6 to 60 months for U-11. For U-15 soccer athletes, the experience playing soccer ranges from 12 to
72 months. The prevalence for musculoskeletal pain and previous injury were 36% and 10%, respectively, for the entire sample of youth soccer players. Among youth athletes who reported pain, the most
affected regions were thigh (36%), leg (27%) and ankle (18%). The VAS mean score was of 3,4 and 3,3 for U-9 and U-11 respectively. Previous injury was not reported by U-11 athletes and musculoskeletal
pain was not reported by U-15 athletes. The magnitude of pelvic tilt was not statistically different between U-9, U-11 and U-15 soccer athletes. However, the U-9 and U-11 athletes had greater
asymmetry of pelvic stabilization for their dominant and non-dominant sides.


Conclusions: In the present study, a significant pelvic tilt during the bridge test with unilateral knee extension was observed in U-9, U-11 and U-15 soccer athletes. However, only
U-9 and U-11 athletes shown asymmetry in active control of pelvis. In addition, U-9 and U-11 athletes also reported musculoskeletal pain. The possible association between asymmetry in active control
of pelvis and prevalence of any kind of musculoskeletal pain or injury needs further investigation.

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