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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

Parvalbumin Expression and Distribution in the Hippocampal Formation of Rats Submitted to Enriched Environment or Physical Exercise During Postnatal Brain Development

Abstract Theme

Neuroscience and sport

Type Presentation

Poster

Abstract Authors

Presenter Fernando Tadeu Serra - Faculdade do Clube Náutico Mogiano (FCNM); Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes (Programa de Pós-graduação em Neurologia e Neurociências; Núcleo de Pesquisas Tecnológicas) - BR
Bruno Henrique Silva Araújo Torres - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP) (Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery) - BR
Laila Brito Torres - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP) (Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery) - BR
Flávia Dona - Universidade Anhanguera de São Paulo (UNIAN) (Reabilitação do Equilíbrio Corporal e Inclusão Social) - BR
Francisco Romero Cabral - Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE) (Brain Institute) - BR
Maria José da Silva Fernandes - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP) (Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery) - BR
Ricardo Mario Arida - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP) (Department of Physiology) - BR
Sérgio Gomes da Silva - Faculdade do Clube Náutico Mogiano (FCNM); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein (HIAE); Universidade de Mogi das Cruzes (UMC) (Programa de Pós-graduação em Neurologia e Neurociências; Brain Institute; Núcleo de Pesquisas Tecnológicas) - BR

Presentation Details

Poster Exhibition Site (Local): Orange - 6        Date: 2 September        Time: 8am to 7pm        Presenter: Fernando Serra

Abstract Resume

Background: Several models of experience have been found to influence molecular systems that are important for maintaining neural function and plasticity. The stimuli required to
elicit plasticity are thought to be activity-dependent. In this context, the physical activity models have been used to explore experience effects on brain function. Nevertheless, there are only few
studies that investigate the effect of these models in the brain in the maturational process. Therefore, we investigated whether environmental enrichment or forced physical exercise would promote
similar changes in the hippocampal formation of developing rats. For this aim, we performed an immunohistochemical and immunoblotting study using the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin as a
neuroplastic marker.

Methods: Male Wistar rats aged 21 postnatal days old (P21) were divided into three groups: enriched environment (EE; n=8), exercise (EX; n=8) and control (CTL; n=8) groups. From P21
to P60, animals of the EE group were placed in large cages containing a variety of objects (e.g., boxes, tubes, ladders and wheel running). Animals of the EX group were submitted to daily exercise on
the treadmill between P21 and P60. Running time and speed gradually increased over this period, reaching a maximum of 18 m/min for 60 min. At P61, animals of all groups were killed for
immunohistochemical (n= 4 for each group) and immunoblot (n= 4 for each group) analyses.

Results: No difference in expression and distribution of parvalbumin hippocampal was detected between EE and CTL groups. However, the parvalbumin expression and distribution was
enhanced significantly in hippocampal formation of rats submitted to daily treadmill exercise (EX group) when compared to the CTL group.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that brain in maturational process may be differentially sensitive to the physical activity models. Specifically, our results suggest that
neuroplasticity during postnatal period of brain development (evaluated by hippocampal  parvalbumin) may be more influenced by physical exercise than to enriched environment.

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