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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

“SAMBO” – BODY PRACTICE OF THE GUARANI AND KAIOWÁ INDIGENOUS

Abstract Theme

Sport history

Type Presentation

Poster

Abstract Authors

Presenter Marina Vinha - Federal University of Grande Dourados (Physical Education) - BR
Veronice Lovato Rossato - State Department of Education (Training indigenous teachers and Guarani Kaiowá) - BR

Presentation Details

Poster Exhibition Site (Local): Gold - 18        Date: 2 September        Time: 8am to 7pm        Presenter: Marina Vinha

Abstract Resume

Background: Body practice Sambo [read sambô] is part of the intangible culture of the Guarani and Kaiowá indigenous inhabitants in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Sambo is a word that
refers to quick movements in all directions, to act physically and mentally before a danger, or facing emergency situations, both requiring much skill. Sambo is a word that refers to quick movements
in all directions, to act physically and mentally before a danger, or facing emergency situations, both requiring much skill.


Methods: The study aims to show the sambo styles coming from primary sources, obtained from practice, theory and illustration produced by the Indians themselves in their field of
research in their villages, located in the south of that state region, and guided by the authors during course training of indigenous teachers. This material comes to the gym expecting to occupy the
space of indigenous knowledge as legitimate knowledge, requiring its recovery, preservation and revitalization.

Results: The origin of the word comes from Paraguay, the Guarani language, and was adopted by the Paraguayan indigenous peoples in continuous transit from one country to another, for
the territories of the current Mato Grosso do Sul and its border with Paraguay were not defined geographically as today. The term is used both by the Guarani Ñandeva (or just "Guarani"), but also by
the Guarani Kaiowá [or just “Kaiowá”], both the linguistic trunk Tupi Guarani and inhabitants in that region. Although each nation has its own way of "defense" because the attacks could happen to
attendance at anytime and anywhere, the Guarani and Kaiowá developed Sambo with ritualistic bonds, so they say, categorically, 'not a fight' because the practice promotes unintentional attacks from
them.

Conclusions: Sambo, rari or jei haguã means shirk, as the linguistic tradition of this people. The practice of rari is aware of all the Guarani Kaiowá and and their learning takes
place from 7 years old. These practices are taught only by the cacique or cacica (chanters), they only know the rules. For example, the teaching of this body practice opponent is instigated by
chanters every moment, in different directions and with different intensities. Thus, we can understand the sambo as a body game, being considered by them one of the oldest practices of the Guarani and
Kaiowá, even not registered in surveys conducted by scholars of this ethnic group.


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