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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

Can the Perceived Exertion Slope Predict the VO2 Peak and the Power Output Peak?

Abstract Theme

Physical activity and health

Type Presentation

Oral presentation

Abstract Authors

Presenter Cayque Brietzke Barreto - School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo (Exercise Psychophysiology Research Group) - BR
Paulo Estevão Franco Alvarenga - School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo (Exercise Psychophysiology Research Group) - BR
Felipe De Russi de Lima - School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo (Exercise Psychophysiology Research Group) - BR
Fabiano Aparecido Pinheiro - School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo (Exercise Psychophysiology Research Group) - BR
Fernando Lopes e Silva Júnior - Federal University of Piauí (Medicine School) - BR
Ricardo Yukio Asano - School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo (Exercise Psychophysiology Research Group) - BR
Flávio de Oliveira Pires - School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo (Exercise Psychophysiology Research Group) - BR

Presentation Details

Room: Urano        Date: 3 September        Time: 14:20:00        Presenter: Cayque Barreto

Abstract Resume

Background: The Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) are Used to Quantify the Perceived Effort Over a Given Maximal or Submaximal Exercise Bout. For Example, RPE is Frequently Applied
in Maximal Incremental Test (MIT) in Order to Ensure that Individuals Achieve Maximal Effort. in this Regard, the Lower Rate of Increase in RPE the Greater MIT Performance as Measured by Peak Power
Output (WPEAK), as it is Expected that Individuals With Improved Physical Fitness may better Tolerate the MIT Exercises Until Exhaustion, Thus Reflecting in Lower RPE Slope and Greater WPEAK. However,
if this Association Between RPE Slope and WPEAK could also be Observed With VO2 Peak (VO2PEAK) Requires Confirmation. Hence, the Aim of Study was to Determine whether the Rate of Increase in RPE
(RPESLOPE) may Play as a Factor to Predict VO2PEAK and WPEAK.

Methods: Nineteen Physically Active Males (25.1 ± 4.9 Years, 175.7 ± 5.7 Cm, 77.8±5.7 Kg, and 11.4±4.5% of Body Fat), Participated in this Study. Participants were Positioned on the
Bicycle for a 3min Baseline Period, which was Followed by a 5min Self-Paced Warm-Up Period. Immediately After the Warm-Up, They Began a Traditional MIT, With Initial Workload Set at 100W and Pedal
Cadence at ~80 Rpm. the Workload was Increased 25W•Min−1 Until Exhaustion. the Exhaustion was Defined as the Incapacity to Maintain the Pedal Cadence at ~80 Rpm (Despite Strong Verbal Encouragements).
Gaseous Exchange (VE and VO2), Heart Rate (HR) were Obtained Continuously, and RPE Every 60s. the VO2PEAK was Determined as the Average of the Three Highest VO2 Values Obtained During the Last of 60s
of the Test. the W Peak was Defined as the Highest Power Output Achieved During the Test. Moreover, RpeSLOPE was also Calculated to Indicate How Fast The RPE Increased Throughout the MIT.

Results: Values (Mean±SD) of RPESLOPE, VO2PEAK and Wpeak were 1.03±0.28a.u, 48.25±5.89 ml kg min-1, and 341.14±36.93 W, Respectively.Moderate Correlations were Observed between
RPESLOPE and WPEAK(R = - 0.517, P < 0, 05), but Not Between RPESLOPE and VO2PEAK(R = 0.211, P > 0, 05).

Conclusions: : These Results Suggest that the Lower RPESLOPE, the Greater WPEAK During the MIT, thus Reflecting an Improved Physical Fitness. However, the Absence of Association
between VO2PEAK and Rpeslope may Suggests that VO2PEAK does Not Depend on the Better Exercise Tolerance (Physical Fitness) During MIT Exercises.


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