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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

Shoulder and Trunk Muscles Activity in Experienced Archers

Abstract Theme

Elite performance

Type Presentation

Poster

Abstract Authors

Presenter Fernando Carvalheiro Reiser - Universidade of São Paulo (Laboratório de Ciências da Atividade Física) - BR
Nadjila Tejo Machado - Universidade of São Paulo (Laboratório de Ciências da Atividade Física) - BR
Marcelo Saldanha Aoki - Universidade of São Paulo (Laboratório de Ciências da Atividade Física) - BR
Fernando Henrique Magalhães - Universidade of São Paulo (Laboratório de Ciências da Atividade Física) - BR
Luis Mochizuki - Universidade of São Paulo (Laboratório de Ciências da Atividade Física) - BR

Presentation Details

Poster Exhibition Site (Local): White - 4        Date: 1 September        Time: 8am to 7pm        Presenter: Fernando Reiser

Abstract Resume

Background:
Archery requires accuracy and precision to score as high as possible. Strength and endurance of the body, specially, shoulder and trunk muscles, are necessary to maintain the alignment of the
bow/arrow system to the target in the draw position. Even experienced archers may not use the same muscle activation along several shots; however, it is unclear how muscle activation changes during an
olympics round (72 shots). The aim of this study is to describe electrical activation of upper limbs and trunk muscles of experienced archers during an olympics round.

Methods:
Four elite archers (age 26.5±4.5 years old; with 13.5±4.5 years of training; and 1315.75±23.25 FITA points) participated into this study. Electrical activity of several muscles (m. pectoralis major,
m. latissimus dorsi, m. upper trapezius, m. serratus anterior, m. rectus abdominis and m. lumbar multifidus) were recorded (2 kHz, bipolar, surface and disposable electrodes) during each shot. Archers
should shot as accurate and precise as possible 72 arrows to a target 70 m away, as simulation on olympics competition.
Archers shot 18 arrows as warm-up; then, they have shot 72 arrows (12 ends of 6 arrows, divided into two groups, 3 minutes to walk 140 m to get the arrows and come back, and 20-minute interval between
groups). Electromyography (EMG) data of all muscles was filtered, demeaned and rectified. Integral (epoch: 500ms prior and after the fall of the clicker) of EMG signal was calculated for all muscles
and compared across 12 ends. Analysis of variance was run to evaluate the results. Significance level p<0,05.

Results:
Archer A display no difference in muscle activity between all shots. Archer B, showed differences in the muscle activity of  Serratus Anterior (p=0,006), and the Lumbar Multifidus (p<0,001) between
the ends. Archer C showed differences in the muscle activity of Serratus Anterior (p=0,01) and the Lumbar Multifidus (p=0,04) between the ends. D archer showed differences in the muscle activity of
Rectus Abdominis (p<0,001), and the Lumbar Multifidus (p<0,001), between the ends. No differences for the Pectoralis Major Clavicular Head, Latissimus Dorsi and Upper Trapezius muscles were been found
between all the archers.

Conclusions:
Elite archers presented different trunk and shoudler girdle muscle activations during 12 ends. 

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