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Abstract Details

Abstract Title

Assessment of Fitness and Training among East African Universities Swimming Athletes

Abstract Theme

Physical activity and health

Type Presentation

Poster

Abstract Authors

Presenter Francis Mundia Mwangi - Kenyatta University (Recreation Management and Exercise Science) - KE
Mary Mwihaki - Kenyatta University (Physical and Health Education) - KE
Lucy-Joy Wachira - Kenyatta University (Physical and Health Education) - KE
Isaah Wabuyabo - Masinde-Muliro (Sports and Health Promotion) - KE
Vincent Onywera - Kenyatta University (Recreation Management and Exercise Science) - KE

Presentation Details

Poster Exhibition Site (Local): Yellow - 36        Date: 3 September        Time: 8am to 7pm        Presenter: Francis Mwangi

Abstract Resume

The role of university sports includes developing skills and fitness for competition and for healthy lifestyles. Fitness and training recommendations for performance and general health are well
documented. Fitness assessment tests related to the mechanics of swimming were used to collect data among 32 (18 male and 14 female) selected East African universities swimming athletes to ascertain
the extent they were meeting fitness and training recommendations.  Descriptive analyses (Mean and Std. Deviation) yielded the following results; Male; Age; 23.11±2.14 [years],Training frequency per
week; 2.50±.924, Waist circumference; 74.17±12.37 [cm], Waist Hip Ratio; .796±.036, Body Mass Index; 22.56±1.82, Percent body fat; 19.78±5.33 [%], Hand strength -right and left grips average
dynamometry; 31.94±6.35 [kg], Leg strength dynamometry; 105.28±24.52 [kg], Back strength dynamometry; 109.50±23.71 [kg], Push-ups; 24.11±5.94 [counts], Sit-ups; 33.67±9.17 [counts], Back-scratch;
.000±2.84 [Inches], Sit-and-reach; 12.06±7.83 [cm], and Body balance -stock stand right and left feet average; 8.31±3.22 [sec]. Female; Age; 21.21±1.63 [years], Training frequency per week; 2.50±.855,
Waist circumference; 72.14±7.70 [cm], Waist Hip Ratio; .720±.052, Body Mass Index; 23.69±3.89, Percent body fat; 35.00±5.79 [%], Hand strength -right and left grips average dynamometry; 16.39±4.86
[kg], Leg strength dynamometry; 66.21±17.34 [kg], Back strength dynamometry; 75.50±18.66 [kg], Push-ups; 19.07±3.97 [counts], Sit-ups; 20.00±9.67 [counts], Back-scratch; -1.59±2.41 [Inches],
Sit-and-reach; 13.61±8.78 [cm], and Body balance -stock stand right and left feet average; 6.64±4.50 [sec].  While most of the variables fitness values met the recommended health levels, the training
frequency and fitness did not meet the athletics levels recommended for high competitive levels. The study recommends that the swimmers enrich their training to get fit for their events, not to rely
solely on fitness acquired in the course of swimming activities.

Comment this abstract (3 comments)

    Francis Mwangi Nairobi / Kenya @ over 1 year ago
    True, resources - both human and physical resources. Also lack of robust talent identification and development programs, training methods that are wanting, among other things.
    Francis Mwangi Nairobi / Kenya @ over 1 year ago
    Liz on whazapp: True, like resources
    Francis Mwangi Nairobi / Kenya @ over 1 year ago
    Liz on whazapp: Frank,how come Africans dont appear in any swim compe. at Rio.Does it mean africans are scared of water? Here majority of african americans dont like to swim and so i wondered if its in the african genes. Response: True. It is intriguing that we do not see dark skinned people taking part, leave alone winning, in some sports. Maybe their forefathers - kina Kinta Kunte, got scared of water when they were being shipped as slaves so much such that it was ingrained in the genes. That could be a hypothesis worth of scientific inquiry. However there are many factors that are at play.